Engage Your Audience: The Power of Kinesthetic Narratives with Melinda Lee - Speak in Flow

Welcome to another captivating episode of the Speak in Flow Podcast! Today, we’re delving into the fascinating world of kinesthetic storytelling—a powerful technique to immediately captivate your audience and leave a lasting impact. Join us as we explore how incorporating the sense of touch into your narratives can elevate your storytelling to new heights.

Harnessing the Sense of Touch in Narratives

In this segment, we unravel the secrets of incorporating the sense of touch into your narratives. From the rough texture of weathered stones to the silky smoothness of a gentle breeze, we explore how leveraging tactile sensations can transport your audience into the heart of your story. Learn how to paint vivid images with words, igniting the senses and forging an unbreakable bond with your listeners.

Immediate Engagement Through Kinesthetic Storytelling

Discover the transformative power of kinesthetic storytelling in this segment. By tapping into the sense of touch, you can instantly capture the attention of your audience and immerse them in your narrative world. Explore techniques to create palpable experiences, allowing your listeners to feel every twist, turn, and emotion of your story. From the warmth of a cozy embrace to the chilling sensation of a bone-chilling wind, learn how to craft narratives that resonate deeply with your audience.

Embracing Emotional Texture in Narratives

In this segment, we delve into the art of infusing your narratives with emotional texture. Explore the subtle nuances of emotion—whether it’s the warmth of joy, the coolness of indifference, or the sharp edges of sorrow. Learn how to convey these emotions through tactile imagery, inviting your audience to not just hear your story, but to feel it in their very bones. Discover the power of vulnerability and authenticity as you share your own experiences, inviting listeners to connect with you on a profound level.

Practical Tips for Incorporating Kinesthetic Narratives

In our final segment, we offer practical tips for incorporating kinesthetic narratives into your storytelling arsenal. From using descriptive language to evoke sensory experiences to practicing active listening to understand your audience’s needs and desires, we provide actionable insights to help you master the art of kinesthetic storytelling. Embrace experimentation, embrace vulnerability, and embrace the power of touch as you embark on your journey to becoming a master storyteller.

As we conclude this enlightening episode, remember that storytelling is not just about words—it’s about creating experiences, forging connections, and leaving a lasting impression on your audience. By incorporating the sense of touch into your narratives, you have the power to transport your listeners to worlds they never imagined and to touch their hearts in ways they never thought possible.

Thank you for joining us on this journey into the world of kinesthetic storytelling. Embrace the power of touch, embrace the power of emotion, and above all, embrace the power of storytelling to change hearts and minds. Until next time, speak in flow, and may your stories touch the souls of all who hear them.

About Melinda:

Melinda Lee is a Presentation Skills Expert, Speaking Coach and nationally renowned Motivational Speaker. She holds an M.A. in Organizational Psychology, is an Insights Practitioner, and is a Certified Professional in Talent Development as well as Certified in Conflict Resolution. For over a decade, Melinda has researched and studied the state of “flow” and used it as a proven technique to help corporate leaders and business owners amplify their voices, access flow, and present their mission in a more powerful way to achieve results.

She has been the TEDx Berkeley Speaker Coach and worked with hundreds of executives and teams from Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Caltrans, Bay Area Rapid Transit System, and more. Currently, she lives in San Francisco, California, and is breaking the ancestral lineage of silence.

Website: https://speakinflow.com/

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LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mpowerall

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#KinestheticStorytelling #EngageYourAudience #SenseOfTouch #NarrativeEngagement #EmotionalTexture #StorytellingMastery #SpeakInFlow #PodcastEngagement #NeurolinguisticsProgramming #TactileNarratives

Transcript
Melinda Lee:

Welcome to a speak and flow podcast episode. Dear

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listeners, I am thrilled that you're here, I have a story to

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tell you what happened the other day, I was walking in my house

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barefoot on my soft carpet. And then Ouch, I stepped on

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something so sharp, and almost felt like a small piece of

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glass. It was so sharp, it sent a signal a stinging feeling into

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my feet and up my legs and I fell to the floor because

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they're hurt so much. Have you ever felt that when you

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accidentally stepped on something and it hurts so much

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the stinging sensation that you fill to the floor?

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I get to tell you this because I want to share my experience. And

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I also want to highlight how we can use the sense of touch in

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narratives. So that you can share your personal experiences,

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share professional experiences, share experiences that will

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resonate with your audience and also bring them in to your

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speeches, your presentations and keep them engage. So the reason

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why this sense of touch is so important in our narratives is

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because it is powerful. And it's also underutilised. Not many

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people will use this technique in their stories, but yet it is

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so powerful. Think about it. Our skin is one of the biggest

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organs, it is the biggest organ, it spans our entire body.

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And we use it to get to know the world around us. We use it to

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understand the world around us. My bearded dragon is actually my

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daughter's bearded dragon. I love this. His name is mu Shu,

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just like the beard or the red dragon and Mulan. So we named

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him mu Shu, because he's also a red bearded dragon. He's so

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cute. I never thought I love a reptile so much. But he's so

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cute. And so he will go around and use his tongue sticks his

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little tongue out to try to get a sense of the world around him.

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If he doesn't know what it is, you're sticking the tongue out

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to try to figure it out. Alright, so that's what we do,

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as humans will touch something to try to figure something else

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out to try to understand. And the three things that we want to

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learn that we get to learn is, as soon as we touch something,

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the nerve endings send a signal to the brain. And that starts to

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question what is the shape? What is the texture? And what is the

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temperature? So when you think about that way, you can always

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ask yourself, when I'm in the story, what do I want to

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describe, I just described the temperature, the temperature,

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the texture, or the shape.

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And you want to describe Well, first you want to understand

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what the purpose of your story and what the story is trying to

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do, what is what is the reason for the story so that you can

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therefore understand what details to include. And then

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from there is the details of matter are important, then you

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include the sense of touch. And, and you include you can include

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really quickly in a easy simple way, texture, temperature, or

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shape, and include the ones that people are familiar with. For

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example, I grabbed the sponge. So what texture is a sponge? If

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you think about it, ask yourself what is that texture? It's a

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little it's rough, it's not. So you could describe when I grab

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the rough sponge or a cotton ball, what is the texture of a

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cotton ball soft I grabbed the soft sponge or the soft cotton

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ball. So, resume are thicker, about different examples of

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common feelings, common senses of touch, that people can

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immediately get the sense of, they immediately understand when

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I stepped on the greedy sand that people immediately can get

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that. So describing textures, the hot plate can immediately

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get the temperature of that. Or the we talked about texture, we

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talked about temperature. And now we talk we can talk about

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the shape, right the shape of the hot plate, the round plate.

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So those are the three things that our brain wants to

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understand. And it's an opportunity for you to describe

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using the sense of touch, texture, shape, and also

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temperature and then expanding that even more. Think about if

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you want to highlight a character or the environment or

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an emotion even the sense of touch can elicit even more

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Mission. Let's go with character first. I'm thinking about a

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beach, a surfer? How can we use a sense of touch to describe a

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surfer? As he was walking along the gritty beach, the sand on

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the gritty Beach, he used his hand to comb through his long

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silky hair. So you can start to see the character and he took

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his surfboard and went out to the waves. So you can start to

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see the character, we're developing the character using

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this sense of touch. What about the sense of touch with emotion?

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How can we use the sense of touch to describe emotion? Let's

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say I want to describe a warm feeling a warm, loving feeling.

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I think about hands I think about when people are holding

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hands, the warmth of her hands. When he grabbed her hand, he

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felt a sense of warmth and immediately calmed his anxiety

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or nerves for the day. Her hand was like a lifeline, the warmth

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of her hand.

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The sense of touch with connection and emotion. And then

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finally, using the sense of touch to describe an

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environment. I did that briefly with the with the beach, the

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gritty sand the surfer, what about the when you're in a

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forest, and you want to describe walking along the soil or the

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ground? What does it feel like to walk on soil? Moshe, as I

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walked on the mushy soil, if you're running out of ideas on

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how to describe what that sense of touch what you're feeling, go

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ahead and type it out into Google, Google Chat. UBT will

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have lots of ways to describe what you're feeling, the sense

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of touch. And then you'll spark ideas, to be able to create a

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narrative describe exactly how you're feeling what you're felt,

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so that it also elicits the emotion, the visceral feeling

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within others. Right, describe it versus saying it. This

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describe what you felt using details using visceral words,

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kinesthetic words. Mushy CTA, numbing, cold, hot, so we're

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going into temperature warm. And if you need some help, I've got

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a speaking sprint bootcamp where you can practice how to use

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descriptive storytelling, and flushing out ideas, flushing out

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ways to to talk about what you're feeling, what you're

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smelling, what you're touching, and what you're seeing in the

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speaking sprint. So I invite you to join us, but continue to

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speak continue to describe your experiences and the details of

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it using descriptive storytelling. And that will

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bring in a multi sensory effect within people because they will

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conjure up different feelings, different visceral sensations,

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and keep them engaged. So that therefore it helps solidify your

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message. It also brings it back home, they cannot wait and they

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cannot stop listening. They cannot help but see things and

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hear things and feel things. And so that's super fun. It's so

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powerful. And so I encourage you to continue practice. Join me in

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the speaking sprints. And until next time, I'll see you on the

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other side. I'm your sister in flow. Take care