Leadership Strategies For Giving Back, Meeting The Mission, And Contributing To The Greater Good Of Community With Debra Lockwood - Speak in Flow

Debra has sat on many boards over the years for multiple organizations that were all going in different directions with all different cultures. While she understood the importance of being professional at all times, she also knew the importance of speaking the truth while respecting her peers’ voices.

After many years, Debra recognized the need for personal alignment in her professional endeavors. She has so much to give and loves being of service, so as a retired CPA she aligned herself with a nonprofit hospital board where she could not only meet their mission, but feel enthusiastic about doing so.

Debra’s Bio:

President & Chief Financial Officer of Georgia Proton Care Center Inc., a subsidiary of Provident Resources Group Inc. Immediate Past President and Chief Financial Officer, Provident Resources Group Inc.

Since 2002, Ms. Lockwood has been a member of Provident’s senior management team, responsible for financial oversight and the development and implementation of strategic and operational initiatives in senior housing, advancing education, healthcare and affordable housing. Prior to 2002, Ms. Lockwood gained extensive professional experience as a practicing certified public accountant during which time she provided business valuation, consulting, and audit and tax services.

With her commitment to public service, Ms. Lockwood served in healthcare on the Boards of Baton Rouge General and Woman’s Hospital, in affordable housing on the Board of Commissioners of the Louisiana Housing Finance Agency, and as national chairman of the American Heart Association 2010-11.

Education:

Master of Business Administration, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 1999 Bachelor of Science in Accounting, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 1977 Professional Accreditations and Affiliations Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Louisiana Accredited in Business Valuation with the American Institute of CPAs Member, Louisiana Society of CPAs (LSCPA) Lockwood has served on the Strategic Planning Committee, Litigation Services, and Peer Review Committees of the LSCPA.

About Melinda:

Melinda Lee is a Presentation Skills Expert, Speaking Coach and nationally renowned Motivational Speaker. She holds an M.A. in Organizational Psychology, is an Insights Practitioner, and is a Certified Professional in Talent Development as well as Certified in Conflict Resolution. For over a decade, Melinda has researched and studied the state of “flow” and used it as a proven technique to help corporate leaders and business owners amplify their voices, access flow, and present their mission in a more powerful way to achieve results.

She has been the TEDx Berkeley Speaker Coach and worked with hundreds of executives and teams from Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Caltrans, Bay Area Rapid Transit System, and more. Currently, she lives in San Francisco, California, and is breaking the ancestral lineage of silence.

Website: https://speakinflow.com/

Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/speakinflow

Instagram: https://instagram.com/speakinflow

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mpowerall

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Transcript
Melinda Lee:

Hello, everyone, welcome to the Speak In Flow

Melinda Lee:

podcast, I have a very special treat and amazing leader who

Melinda Lee:

does so much for the community. Welcome Debra Lockwood, she was

Melinda Lee:

the former president of the provenance Resources Group, the

Melinda Lee:

National chairperson for the American Heart Association from

Melinda Lee:

2010 to 2011. And right now she gives back to our cancer

Melinda Lee:

patients, as the President of the Emory Proton Therapy Centre,

Melinda Lee:

or group, centre, centre. Thank you so much, Deborah, it's

Melinda Lee:

really nice to have you. I've heard so much about you through

Melinda Lee:

your amazing daughter, Sarah. And so I love to be able to

Melinda Lee:

share like your experiences with our audience, because I feel

Melinda Lee:

like they can have so much takeaways from your leadership

Melinda Lee:

and all that you've done to help the community. And also what are

Melinda Lee:

some of those challenges that you've experienced to rise to

Melinda Lee:

the top? And so my first question to you is, in your

Melinda Lee:

career in your profession, I'm sure you've had gone through a

Melinda Lee:

lot. But what is one key moment that you felt that that was a

Melinda Lee:

challenge for you? And what did you do to overcome that

Melinda Lee:

challenge? What was happening? So first, I was in my late 20s,

Melinda Lee:

which meant I wasn't very experienced compared to now. And

Melinda Lee:

I was being challenged by partners and a firm that I

Melinda Lee:

worked with at apt to bring in new clients. And I was just

Melinda Lee:

doing a great job as as a CPA doing what I do. Not really

Melinda Lee:

understanding, well, why do I have to do duck clients just

Melinda Lee:

show up? And I was then said, Well, you need to go get him. I

Melinda Lee:

didn't know how that would happen. And so I was asked to be

Melinda Lee:

on a board, and to test myself to see if I could represent the

Melinda Lee:

firm represent myself. It was a I had to take a deep swallow

Melinda Lee:

then and say, Can I do this? Because I didn't know. But

Melinda Lee:

remember your thoughts that were going on the feelings that you

Melinda Lee:

had?

Debra Lockwood:

You know, I think I underestimated what the

Debra Lockwood:

responsibilities would be number one, because I did not realise

Debra Lockwood:

what a board was, honestly, that a working board was really

Debra Lockwood:

contributing to their mission, and to get them to achieve their

Debra Lockwood:

goals. And I didn't understand that well, nor did I understand

Debra Lockwood:

that a well run board is one that has people with different

Debra Lockwood:

expertise to provide what a full board needs, whether it's

Debra Lockwood:

something specific, specific with a mission, whether it's

Debra Lockwood:

accounting, arts, legal, or it could be government relations,

Debra Lockwood:

all these things. And when you start realising that a board

Debra Lockwood:

really is made up of a lot of individuals with certain

Debra Lockwood:

expertise, when you put them together, you have a full

Debra Lockwood:

company basically running, right. I mean, yeah, it was not

Debra Lockwood:

what the teams are, when you're in, if you're thinking about the

Debra Lockwood:

leaders, and you are all leaders of a part of a team, and you

Debra Lockwood:

have your specific niche or expertise, you're providing the

Debra Lockwood:

well rounded that view of where you're going in a project. And

Debra Lockwood:

so same thing with a board. And so but you went in there, not

Debra Lockwood:

really knowing the full scope, and then you went in, sometimes

Debra Lockwood:

not knowing everything. Well, I did. But I also understood that,

Debra Lockwood:

you know, if you're a CPA, they're almost always going to

Debra Lockwood:

tattoo you as treasurer, immediately. And that puts you

Debra Lockwood:

in a leadership role. Again, not sure whether I could do it, but

Debra Lockwood:

I was, I was actually in my wheelhouse because I knew how to

Debra Lockwood:

do what I was being asked to do. But I also felt a greater

Debra Lockwood:

responsibility to do it in a better way, or whatever. But I

Debra Lockwood:

found that that was really, once I knew my craft, in this case,

Debra Lockwood:

I'm a CPA, once I knew my craft, I knew a lot more than a lot of

Debra Lockwood:

people who did something in another craft, right, and

Debra Lockwood:

putting them together made all work better. So that helped me

Debra Lockwood:

have more confidence. I don't walk into any group talking

Debra Lockwood:

right away.

Debra Lockwood:

But I wait to hear I like to listen first to hear what is

Debra Lockwood:

expected of the members. And sometimes there's more to it.

Debra Lockwood:

And then I'm suggesting now, but you learn very quickly, where

Debra Lockwood:

you can help or not, or what you enjoy doing or not, and which

Debra Lockwood:

boards you like or not, which all of that has happened to me

Debra Lockwood:

over the years. But when I do hit a home run, and I am in a

Debra Lockwood:

place where I'm actually contributing to the health of

Debra Lockwood:

the organisation and helping them read the meet their

Debra Lockwood:

mission, and at the same time collaborating with other

Debra Lockwood:

business people or non business people that just kind of broaden

Debra Lockwood:

my perspective. And those people I still see to this day 40 years

Debra Lockwood:

later and I you know remembering you on this board. Yeah, I

Debra Lockwood:

remember that it was fun. Or it wasn't, there was a difficult

Debra Lockwood:

time. And we all work through it. So that's really, I think,

Debra Lockwood:

understanding what is needed before you walk into it. Right?

Debra Lockwood:

Not not pigeonholing yourself, per se, because, right?

Debra Lockwood:

Connected to being a leader, right? Just because I want to be

Debra Lockwood:

a CPA and I can do finances doesn't mean that I'm also not

Debra Lockwood:

capable of being the president. Yeah, no, you said something

Debra Lockwood:

very key here. So you went in with your specific craft a CPA.

Debra Lockwood:

But then once you got in, you really listen to other people,

Debra Lockwood:

and found some secret nasty, maybe some interconnections?

Debra Lockwood:

Yes. And no moment? And where can we all together? Create

Debra Lockwood:

something, but that is scary sometimes. Because all a lot of

Debra Lockwood:

the times we want to go in all prepared and know exactly what,

Debra Lockwood:

what the conversation is gonna look like. And so you're

Debra Lockwood:

encouraging us like, just go in no your crap. But then listen,

Debra Lockwood:

listen to what's going on. I have a question that have you

Debra Lockwood:

been in a conversation and one of those meetings where someone

Debra Lockwood:

doesn't agree? So it sounds like you were able to build

Debra Lockwood:

alliances, collaborations? And what about when someone doesn't

Debra Lockwood:

agree with you? Well, first, it's about being professional at

Debra Lockwood:

all times. Yeah. And I, if I know that it's a controversial

Debra Lockwood:

subject, I do a homework, I do homework, I come in with my

Debra Lockwood:

facts, and what I view something being and if I'm outnumbered, I

Debra Lockwood:

am out number two democratic society, and I then make a

Debra Lockwood:

decision whether it is still in my in the in the organization's

Debra Lockwood:

best interest to stay aligned, or if they're going in a

Debra Lockwood:

different way, and I don't agree with it, then it's best for me

Debra Lockwood:

to move on and let them do their thing. And so I've been in both

Debra Lockwood:

situations, you know, in a hospital and one case where I

Debra Lockwood:

did not understand why they were doing what they were doing, in

Debra Lockwood:

terms of alliances, and, you know, they went on did their

Debra Lockwood:

thing, and they're doing great, but I was uncomfortable. So it's

Debra Lockwood:

about it's a, it's an evaluation both ways, they're evaluating

Debra Lockwood:

you, but you're also evaluating them, if you can rest, when

Debra Lockwood:

you're finished the day, and just go home and say it was a

Debra Lockwood:

nice day, or it was a difficult day, but we all are on the same

Debra Lockwood:

page that works. But if on the other hand, you go home, you

Debra Lockwood:

don't feel well about the whole deal, and you continue to feel

Debra Lockwood:

that way, then it's time to make make a change and allow someone

Debra Lockwood:

else an opportunity. Because as a nonprofit, there are lots of

Debra Lockwood:

people that are looking for those types of opportunities. So

Debra Lockwood:

I think it's also you know, appropriate to let other people

Debra Lockwood:

have that opportunity when you've already done some and

Debra Lockwood:

decided it's not for you, right, and then let go of the need to

Debra Lockwood:

have a way or prove yourself and in what if it falls back on you

Debra Lockwood:

though? What if, because that's ultimately the decision if you

Debra Lockwood:

let them do something, and then the repercussions fall back on

Debra Lockwood:

you. The only decision that I thought I really needed to walk

Debra Lockwood:

away from was really a strategic decision, which was where was

Debra Lockwood:

the organisation going. And it was a very volatile environment

Debra Lockwood:

all around. And I just didn't, I didn't appreciate the direction

Debra Lockwood:

it was going. It was relative to mergers and other things. So I

Debra Lockwood:

been through two of those. At this point, one I was

Debra Lockwood:

appreciative of, and the other one I was less. But the bottom

Debra Lockwood:

line was learning that I'm not helpful if I'm not enthusiastic,

Debra Lockwood:

right. I'm not helpful. If I'm just sitting there trying to

Debra Lockwood:

question why are we doing this? If in fact, everybody has

Debra Lockwood:

decided something different,

Melinda Lee:

right?

Debra Lockwood:

I'm the oddball. It's still I believe in a

Debra Lockwood:

democratic society. And I do believe organisations go in

Debra Lockwood:

different places and have different cultures, depending on

Debra Lockwood:

who leaders are. And if it's not my thing, it's not. It's okay.

Melinda Lee:

Have you had How do you communicate some of these

Melinda Lee:

difficult communication expressions? Uh huh. But well,

Debra Lockwood:

I think I think you don't necessarily you

Debra Lockwood:

express yourself that this is not something that you think is

Debra Lockwood:

a great idea without belittling anybody else's thought process.

Debra Lockwood:

And then you know, at the appropriate time, you don't make

Debra Lockwood:

a deal of it. You don't do it that night and say, I'm off the

Debra Lockwood:

board, I'm out. I don't want to be here anymore. That's never

Debra Lockwood:

happened to me. I've never done that. You wait until the

Debra Lockwood:

appropriate time decide I'm not going to renew my I'm not going

Debra Lockwood:

to go to the next step level. And that's how I do it. Because

Debra Lockwood:

it keeps everybody in tact and you're still working and

Debra Lockwood:

everybody's doing things but you know, I I look for things that

Debra Lockwood:

are fulfilling to me as well. And building my energy and not

Debra Lockwood:

taking my energy.

Melinda Lee:

Right. And I think that's our decision. Yeah, yeah,

Melinda Lee:

yeah, going in and like you said, what fulfils me if it

Melinda Lee:

doesn't feel good and what I'm what I'm in alignment with and

Melinda Lee:

holding that to be true and saying that you might be the

Melinda Lee:

oddball, but at least you're saying it, because you know

Melinda Lee:

that, hey, there's something that didn't sit well with you.

Melinda Lee:

And so you're saying it and saying in the appropriate time

Melinda Lee:

doing the research and saying not belittling people caring

Melinda Lee:

Yeah. And, and then so once you were on the board, and then what

Melinda Lee:

happened after you you found your way in the board and with

Melinda Lee:

the board

Debra Lockwood:

in a board or just in

Melinda Lee:

the last one that you're talking about?

Debra Lockwood:

Where where there was dissension?

Melinda Lee:

Yeah, yeah,

Debra Lockwood:

there was actually leadership change with

Debra Lockwood:

management, too. So there were a lots of changes going on at the

Debra Lockwood:

time. So it was just, it was all came unglued a little bit. But

Debra Lockwood:

it all got back together. So it was good. It's all but you know,

Debra Lockwood:

we're still all still, you know, community that I'm in favour of

Debra Lockwood:

and hospital I'm in favour of and people i i appreciate, and,

Debra Lockwood:

but I'm not having to stress about it.

Melinda Lee:

Right,

Debra Lockwood:

made that decision.

Melinda Lee:

And you saw you do a lot, you're in the nonprofit

Melinda Lee:

industry, what made you decide to do that,

Debra Lockwood:

you know, I, I was spending a lot of time on

Debra Lockwood:

boards, all sorts of boards, and really felt it was great for me,

Debra Lockwood:

I enjoyed it. But I also had a practice that I was trying to

Debra Lockwood:

maintain. And I decided that I was going to sell my practice

Debra Lockwood:

and to one of my partners and go into industry, but chose

Debra Lockwood:

nonprofits, because I felt that I was going to marry both right

Debra Lockwood:

building, I don't have to build a practice anymore. But I can

Debra Lockwood:

give back and be part of a mission and go forward and

Debra Lockwood:

whatever. And so I did that. And that has been the right decision

Debra Lockwood:

for me all along. I'm certainly still I, I was I was CFO at

Debra Lockwood:

provident for a number of years, 20 years or so. And still did a

Debra Lockwood:

lot of accounting, but it was more strategic in the last 15

Debra Lockwood:

years or so. Then detail. But everything I learned at all the

Debra Lockwood:

elements before then contributed to my being able to be in the

Debra Lockwood:

role that I was at provident.

Melinda Lee:

Mm, got it. So you're able to take it with you.

Melinda Lee:

Yeah, good choice for you.

Debra Lockwood:

Yes. And all those relationship building. So

Debra Lockwood:

in Providence case where we may be dealing with university x,

Debra Lockwood:

and then another university y, and there's a project for

Debra Lockwood:

classroom space, and one and there's housing on another, our

Debra Lockwood:

we're building a hotel for a convention centre, you got to

Debra Lockwood:

build relationships with people you don't know, some of whom are

Debra Lockwood:

questioning, why are you here? Because none of whom are saying,

Debra Lockwood:

oh, gosh, you're a wonder for us because we need you. And we have

Debra Lockwood:

to learn how to explain ourselves, in a humble way to

Debra Lockwood:

make sure that everybody understands that we're here to

Debra Lockwood:

serve them, and, and provide whatever we need to provide at

Debra Lockwood:

the time. And that is, so learning those smaller tasks in

Debra Lockwood:

smaller boards taught taught me how to work in a team that is

Debra Lockwood:

made up of attorneys and developers and universities and,

Debra Lockwood:

you know, government entities and so forth at the table, same

Debra Lockwood:

table, all with different perspectives, all with different

Debra Lockwood:

objectives. But trying to remember why are we here, if

Debra Lockwood:

it's the university, we're here for the students, whatever you

Debra Lockwood:

do, you're here for the students, I don't know what

Debra Lockwood:

you're dealing with on your desk, but you're here for the

Debra Lockwood:

students. And if we know that this housing, that safe and

Debra Lockwood:

sound and comfortable is a better learning environment than

Debra Lockwood:

you are doing your job as an administrator to make that

Debra Lockwood:

happen. Using all those tools,

Melinda Lee:

but what happens in larger stage? Yeah, yeah, I

Melinda Lee:

mean, that's so important, reminding people of the reason

Melinda Lee:

why we're here because so often, we can just be on the position,

Melinda Lee:

I want it this way, or I want it this way, and just keep talking

Melinda Lee:

about that. And then, and then sometimes we might forget, what

Melinda Lee:

is the real reason that we're here and try to find that

Melinda Lee:

commonality.

Debra Lockwood:

And not make it personal,

Melinda Lee:

not make it personal

Debra Lockwood:

when we realise that you're here as a servant to

Debra Lockwood:

help a mission, get accomplished. It is a public,

Debra Lockwood:

you're serving the public. And when you're serving the public,

Debra Lockwood:

you don't necessarily know Joe Smith or whomever, you just know

Debra Lockwood:

that in general, you're going to move the needle a little bit.

Debra Lockwood:

That's what your goal is. Just keep moving the needle over

Debra Lockwood:

time, it becomes a big needle that gets moved, but just

Debra Lockwood:

knowing that and how we do it when you're discussing tactics.

Debra Lockwood:

That's just really not important. At the end of the

Debra Lockwood:

day. If you have different people with attitudes, I mean,

Debra Lockwood:

take Technology, you know, people that do not want

Debra Lockwood:

technology Absolutely. Do not want it. Right. But others see

Debra Lockwood:

technologies as a solution. right things done faster, right?

Debra Lockwood:

It can still get done. It's just a matter of how quickly how

Debra Lockwood:

quickly and, and how we can work together to do this. Yes.

Melinda Lee:

Whether you use technology or not, and keep our

Melinda Lee:

eye on the prize to keep your eye on why we're here. Yeah, I

Melinda Lee:

mean, that very clear. And being that underpin to move us through

Melinda Lee:

it was was specially when there's challenges because we

Melinda Lee:

know we're always gonna face those challenges, and hurdles

Melinda Lee:

and obstacles. How do you do so much? How do you manage your

Melinda Lee:

your energy and your your passion? What are your Yeah,

Melinda Lee:

what do you do for yourself?

Debra Lockwood:

I have this insatiable, insatiable passion

Debra Lockwood:

to do things. Honestly, I like to, I like to work. And I mean,

Debra Lockwood:

it could be whether I'm, you know, coming up with a new

Debra Lockwood:

recipe. And I like to cook and I like to play with young

Debra Lockwood:

grandson, I like to hang with my kids. I like to, you know,

Debra Lockwood:

dance. I like to be on a board. And you know, I like to be

Debra Lockwood:

challenged with very technical financing options and solutions

Debra Lockwood:

and coming up with operations. I just, I like projects, and I can

Debra Lockwood:

come up with a project all day long. So and that energises me

Debra Lockwood:

feel connected. And so why am I almost 70 and not retired?

Debra Lockwood:

Because I don't want to stop. So that's kind of where I am.

Melinda Lee:

And what are you excited about? The next decade?

Debra Lockwood:

You know, I'm excited about trying to smell

Debra Lockwood:

the roses.

Melinda Lee:

Yeah,

Debra Lockwood:

you try and enjoy my faith. I'm trying to

Debra Lockwood:

really offer more in my faith and try and get closer to things

Debra Lockwood:

that are important to me and people that are important to me

Debra Lockwood:

and seeing a softer side and I you know, just had my 50th class

Debra Lockwood:

reunion this goodness, every show relaxed. I went, it's about

Debra Lockwood:

time. You know, but that that's what I'm just trying to smell

Debra Lockwood:

the roses. Enjoy that. Enjoy my new grandson. And hopefully,

Debra Lockwood:

Sarah will have a grandchild for us soon. Oh, I hope so. I hope

Debra Lockwood:

so. How was your dream really important? 2022 was a big year

Debra Lockwood:

for us. We have a son and a daughter both got married? Yes,

Debra Lockwood:

I've had a baby. So we've had a big 22. So

Melinda Lee:

how to smell the roses now. Oh, those babies will

Melinda Lee:

stop us. Stop Us and force us to smell the roses. And appreciate

Melinda Lee:

all those little things. Right when there's, they're curious.

Melinda Lee:

And it's so fun to see the world from through their eyes. Yes.

Melinda Lee:

And so it's a joy. That's awesome. So what? I had a

Melinda Lee:

question, what, What advice would you give to these heart

Melinda Lee:

centred our audience out there? Mainly heart centred leaders

Melinda Lee:

there, they're doing the best they can they want to do the

Melinda Lee:

right things. And they may have some doubt of what they're doing

Melinda Lee:

and do it Do I belong here? Does what I do matter. And they may

Melinda Lee:

not speak up as much. And so they're here to gather all the

Melinda Lee:

tools, the techniques, what are some things a piece of advice

Melinda Lee:

that you would give to these leaders to unleash that voice?

Melinda Lee:

And let

Debra Lockwood:

you know, I think I think number one, they

Debra Lockwood:

need to find something that's going to make them happy in

Debra Lockwood:

terms of mission, a connection to the mission, or a connection

Debra Lockwood:

to the people who have a connection to the mission, which

Debra Lockwood:

if you don't have a connection to the mission, but you have a

Debra Lockwood:

connection to the people. And it's just another social

Debra Lockwood:

opportunity that you can do something together and do

Debra Lockwood:

something good, like Habitat for Humanity, humanity, right?

Debra Lockwood:

People aren't necessarily on board, but they like doing that

Debra Lockwood:

they need to build a house. But they still get involved. But

Debra Lockwood:

it's about finding something that is a talent you don't mind.

Debra Lockwood:

So if you I'm not very good with a hammer. So that's not my

Debra Lockwood:

thing. But but you know, but I do I have gone out there to

Debra Lockwood:

bring water but I don't do that. But finding something that you

Debra Lockwood:

can connect to. And if you don't connect it, there are so many

Debra Lockwood:

nonprofits out there. Just find think about something that you

Debra Lockwood:

enjoy doing and find a nonprofit that fits it right and see if

Debra Lockwood:

there's that culture there the leadership that's there and I

Debra Lockwood:

mean, the management team, if you relate to them and feel

Debra Lockwood:

comfortable then you are good to go. I have people that I know

Debra Lockwood:

recently who started they were parents who liked a certain kind

Debra Lockwood:

of international school and things went wrong with the

Debra Lockwood:

school that was there before and the parents decided we're gonna

Debra Lockwood:

do this ourselves. And they did it it's an fabulous school now

Debra Lockwood:

so it's it's just about finding the right thing to do that that

Debra Lockwood:

you relate to.

Melinda Lee:

Yeah, when you do for them like so they're not

Melinda Lee:

they don't have the right thing they don't know what do you

Melinda Lee:

think that will do for them when they do find it? What is it

Debra Lockwood:

I believe that you will find a burning in your

Debra Lockwood:

soul that you didn't know you were trying to find. Yeah. And

Debra Lockwood:

Heart Association for me was that, honestly, from a from a,

Debra Lockwood:

from a civic perspective, it was the best civic thing I was

Debra Lockwood:

involved in. And let it's still going. It was started in 96. And

Debra Lockwood:

it's still going today. And for me, provendent helped me there

Debra Lockwood:

too, because I was able to feed the beast of my, my profession

Debra Lockwood:

and be challenged. You know, that way I be in Louisiana and

Debra Lockwood:

speaking to, you know, bankers in New York, or attorneys in San

Debra Lockwood:

Francisco, or wherever, and I'm still here. And but so I felt

Debra Lockwood:

very challenged that way. And I enjoyed it. And at the same time

Debra Lockwood:

making certain I mean, our motto is building communities. And

Debra Lockwood:

community is a very generic term, a community can be defined

Debra Lockwood:

as your classroom, it can be defined as a whole school, a

Debra Lockwood:

whole community, a state, all the universities, XYZ, it can be

Debra Lockwood:

defined a million ways. And that's what it is you find the

Debra Lockwood:

community that you want to make a difference in and see how you

Debra Lockwood:

can do it. And don't necessarily think that the first bite at the

Debra Lockwood:

apple is going to work. You just finding them, you know, a lot of

Debra Lockwood:

papers, a lot of there usually a lot of ads that talk about

Debra Lockwood:

nonprofits that have things going for the next month, and

Debra Lockwood:

you can just drop in and see what you thought. And try that

Debra Lockwood:

interesting.

Melinda Lee:

And then when you have that fire, the difference

Melinda Lee:

between having the fire and not, when you find out then one

Melinda Lee:

thing, right and you have that fire, and you and you realise

Melinda Lee:

just how much you can push through. Because it's not going

Melinda Lee:

to work, although it's not going to work right away, but you

Melinda Lee:

realise and you see how much we could push through with that

Melinda Lee:

fire. You then get this look back and say, Wow, I did that.

Melinda Lee:

That was me. And I really feel that.

Debra Lockwood:

And so when you do it in a nonprofit world,

Debra Lockwood:

yeah, yeah. Hence to make you feel more confident, because you

Debra Lockwood:

don't necessarily when you're younger, push to be a leader,

Debra Lockwood:

when you're 25, maybe not even when you're 30. And then at 40,

Debra Lockwood:

you start realising Wow, to do something. But when you've got

Debra Lockwood:

the experience in a non threatening way to take charge

Debra Lockwood:

of something, then you realise, oh, I can do that in a work

Debra Lockwood:

environment. It transfers, it's just skill set that can transfer

Debra Lockwood:

and can do it in a way that does not make you feel that you're

Debra Lockwood:

putting yourself at risk, financially or otherwise.

Melinda Lee:

Right. Awesome. And one last question. This is what

Melinda Lee:

I remember, I was gonna ask you, how has your faith supported you

Melinda Lee:

throughout this journey?

Debra Lockwood:

You know, the one thing about faith is

Debra Lockwood:

trusting God, and to let it go. If something is we talked about

Debra Lockwood:

difficult situation, and if that is not working for you, you have

Debra Lockwood:

to know that it's bigger than you, and you do what you can and

Debra Lockwood:

then you have to allow others to do it. i My faith has helped me

Debra Lockwood:

to understand I can't control everything. I just can't. I have

Debra Lockwood:

to allow it to be handled by others when it needs to be him.

Melinda Lee:

Right. Right. Right. So we do the best we can

Melinda Lee:

and something that when it doesn't work out what's bigger

Melinda Lee:

than us? It makes sense. That makes sense. Because there's a

Melinda Lee:

bigger plan, there could be a bigger reason than right. And I

Melinda Lee:

don't know that we don't honour. It always is when I look back at

Melinda Lee:

some of the things that I've gone through. I was like, oh,

Melinda Lee:

that's the reason why that happened. It's like, no, no, no,

Melinda Lee:

no, that's not supposed to be this way. But when you know,

Melinda Lee:

thinking back, and we can all reflect that all the things that

Melinda Lee:

we've gone through, you realise, you hope to realise that that

Melinda Lee:

was a reason. You connect the dots. And then they can also

Melinda Lee:

help us for going forward, what fires what lights or fire What,

Melinda Lee:

what's our path?

Debra Lockwood:

And just just I think just understanding that

Debra Lockwood:

you're having an experience today, doing XYZ, because that's

Debra Lockwood:

what you were expected to have is planned all along. You didn't

Debra Lockwood:

even know that. You're having that experience. All those

Debra Lockwood:

experiences add up and over time, you end up in a job like I

Debra Lockwood:

did at provident and oh my goodness, I had no idea. This

Debra Lockwood:

was even here, or this could be we created a company that I

Debra Lockwood:

love. And so I think it's trust and it's also about well, I like

Debra Lockwood:

a lot of projects and I don't mind doing hard work. I have to

Debra Lockwood:

stop myself from doing too much. I really have to stop myself.

Debra Lockwood:

I'm not really good at loud metal on its own. But my age has

Debra Lockwood:

helped me to understand that I'm I'm taking away opportunities

Debra Lockwood:

from others yes by trying to do it myself. So I really in the

Debra Lockwood:

last several years 10-15 years just really, I enjoy being that

Debra Lockwood:

servant here again, I want to be a teacher. I would love to do

Debra Lockwood:

that, you know, to just show what I know not so much sure

Debra Lockwood:

what I know, to help explain in a non threatening way if I'm not

Debra Lockwood:

their boss anymore, it's easier. You know some, huh?

Melinda Lee:

Isn't that interesting when you're not the

Melinda Lee:

boss? It's a little different. But well, going back to what

Melinda Lee:

you're saying saying noticing Sarah, you're amazing powerhouse

Melinda Lee:

daughter was also on our podcast and we dig deep into that which

Melinda Lee:

was really cool. She She really has honed in when to say yes

Melinda Lee:

when to say no listening to our bodies. And because that is a

Melinda Lee:

sign of leadership when we can do that with, with certainty,

Melinda Lee:

saying no, and, and because like you said, when you say no to

Melinda Lee:

things, you're actually opening up opportunities for other

Melinda Lee:

things that are that are more in alignment right now with what

Melinda Lee:

you need. And so check out that the amazing podcast with Sarah.

Melinda Lee:

We're gonna dig into that. And, and so I think that's it. How

Melinda Lee:

old is your grand daughter or son?

Debra Lockwood:

It's a grand son, and he's six months old.

Debra Lockwood:

And we are taking care of him four days a week. Right.

Melinda Lee:

Wonderful. Wonderful. What a blessing.

Melinda Lee:

Congratulation.

Debra Lockwood:

Thank you. We're very happy. Very blessed. Yeah.

Melinda Lee:

I think that's any last words.

Debra Lockwood:

You know, I would just as I was You were

Debra Lockwood:

saying something, just now I thought there were a couple of

Debra Lockwood:

everyday things that I think helped me keep myself in line

Debra Lockwood:

when I tried to overdo. One of them is when you're on an

Debra Lockwood:

aeroplane, you're supposed to put the oxygen on yourself

Debra Lockwood:

before you put it on your child, right? So you have to take care

Debra Lockwood:

of yourself, you have to learn how to take care of yourself.

Debra Lockwood:

And the other is, you know, I I can remember just working myself

Debra Lockwood:

to death. And I had two small children. I said, I don't want

Debra Lockwood:

this job anymore. I literally walked away. I don't want this

Debra Lockwood:

job because I thought I was only going to work an eight to 10

Debra Lockwood:

hour day, not a 15 hour day. And I just walked out one day of the

Debra Lockwood:

executive office and I said, You know what, there's nothing on my

Melinda Lee:

Right, right.

Debra Lockwood:

No, and that was that was 30 years ago. Mm hmm.

Debra Lockwood:

headstone is gonna say Deborah Lockwood, X, Y, Z of y, z, z.

Melinda Lee:

Am I going to regret this? Am I going to

Melinda Lee:

It's just gonna say, wife, Bill, mother, Sarah and Adam, why am I

Melinda Lee:

regret this decision when I die? And most of the time that the

Melinda Lee:

doing this? And it really stopped me in my tracks.

Melinda Lee:

small decisions at work are not right. Or I mean, they're not

Melinda Lee:

the lifetime decisions. That that we're going to take to the

Melinda Lee:

grave and regret. It's usually more of the time we spent with

Melinda Lee:

our family the the meaningful conversation and learning how to

Melinda Lee:

say no using our voice to say no to things cultivating a lot of

Melinda Lee:

us are not speaking up. So cultivating the times that we

Melinda Lee:

need to just say no need to lead with our heart need to lead with

Melinda Lee:

compassion for yourself and for others.

Debra Lockwood:

Yes,

Melinda Lee:

yeah. Voice to do that. Awesome. Thank you so

Melinda Lee:

much, Deborah, and putting the oxygen mask on ourselves. That's

Melinda Lee:

key, right? And so how do we once we know what we need? How

Melinda Lee:

do we communicate that to others?

Debra Lockwood:

Right, right. Well, when you're in leadership,

Debra Lockwood:

you get to say things like, I want to have HR policies that

Debra Lockwood:

have a balance of a family and work period. And I did that

Debra Lockwood:

years ago, and I had someone call me just the other day says,

Debra Lockwood:

you mentored me, I was the best thing you ever did. And we do it

Debra Lockwood:

now. And now we're, you know, one of the best places to be

Debra Lockwood:

employed. So

Melinda Lee:

thank you so much for your help with helping us

Melinda Lee:

today. And also the community to the people around you, and

Melinda Lee:

sharing your knowledge with us.

Debra Lockwood:

Really appreciate it. Enjoyed it. Thank