Mastering Mega Projects: Communication and Leadership Insights with Pratheesh (Prat) Nair - Speak in Flow

Welcome back to another exciting episode of Speak in Flow with your host, Melinda Lee! In today’s episode, we dive into the world of large-scale construction and transportation projects with our fabulous guest, Pratheesh (Prat) Nair, P.E., Vice President of Operations at Fisk Electric. Prat brings over 18 years of industry experience and a wealth of knowledge that will leave you inspired and informed.

About Our Guest: Pratheesh (Prat) Nair, P.E.

Prat Nair is a powerhouse in the construction industry, boasting a degree in Electrical Engineering and a Professional Engineer license. With a career spanning hydropower projects, tunnel construction, water treatment plants, transportation infrastructure, mining operations, and rail projects, Prat has managed it all. Currently, he serves as the Vice President of Operations at Fisk Electric, focusing on operational excellence and project efficiency.

Fun Facts:

– Prat loves playing volleyball and pickleball.

– His family hikes and travels to a new country every year.

– Former Division 1 track team member at Fresno State and soccer player at West Virginia University.

– Prat’s career in construction was inspired by a Discovery Channel documentary on Tunnel Boring Machines during his early days at a coal mine in West Virginia.

Key Points:

1. Mega Project Management:

Prat delves into his role at Fisk Electric, managing mammoth transportation projects like the California high-speed rail and the LA Metro Purple Line. He sheds light on the complexities, challenges, and the meticulous coordination required to keep these projects on track.

2. Leadership Challenges and Strategies:

The conversation takes a deep dive into the primary challenges within the rail industry, including workforce shortages and maintaining engineer motivation over extended projects. Prat shares his strategies for engaging employees, providing feedback, and ensuring open communication.

3. Empathy and Emotional Intelligence in Leadership:

Prat’s leadership style revolves around being approachable, supportive, and emotionally intelligent. He emphasizes the importance of understanding employees’ personal and professional lives, celebrating small victories, and fostering a culture of empathy and communication.

4. Industry Insights and Future Prospects:

Looking ahead, Prat offers insights into the future of the rail industry, including ongoing and upcoming projects, especially in preparation for the 2028 Olympics. He discusses the stability and growth potential within this specialized field, driven by the continuous demand for infrastructure development.

5. Encouraging Diversity and Inclusion:

Prat passionately talks about the growing involvement of women in construction and the benefits of a diverse workforce. He shares how he inspires his daughters to consider careers in this field and the importance of creating an inclusive environment that values all team members’ unique strengths.

Connect with Prat:

– **Company Website:** [www.fiskcorp.com](http://www.fiskcorp.com)

– **LinkedIn Profile:** [Pratheesh (Prat) Nair, P.E.](https://www.linkedin.com/in/pratheesh-prat-nair-p-e/)

Join us for this enlightening episode as Prat Nair takes us through the highs and lows of managing mega projects, leading with empathy, and shaping the future of the rail industry. Tune in, get inspired, and discover how to succeed in the fast-paced world of construction!

Stay fabulous, Melinda

About Melinda:

Melinda Lee is a Presentation Skills Expert, Speaking Coach and nationally renowned Motivational Speaker. She holds an M.A. in Organizational Psychology, is an Insights Practitioner, and is a Certified Professional in Talent Development as well as Certified in Conflict Resolution. For over a decade, Melinda has researched and studied the state of “flow” and used it as a proven technique to help corporate leaders and business owners amplify their voices, access flow, and present their mission in a more powerful way to achieve results.

She has been the TEDx Berkeley Speaker Coach and worked with hundreds of executives and teams from Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Caltrans, Bay Area Rapid Transit System, and more. Currently, she lives in San Francisco, California, and is breaking the ancestral lineage of silence.

Website: https://speakinflow.com/

Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/speakinflow

Instagram: https://instagram.com/speakinflow

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mpowerall

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Transcript
Melinda Lee:

Welcome, dear listeners to the speaking flow

Melinda Lee:

podcast where we share unique experiences to help you unleash

Melinda Lee:

your leadership voice. Today, I have an amazing leader, you're

Melinda Lee:

gonna be so excited. I'm excited. We have Pratt Nair, who

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is the Vice President of Operations for Fisk electric.

Melinda Lee:

Hi, Pratt. Good to see you. Hi, Melinda. Thank you for having

Melinda Lee:

me. Thank you for being here. Can you share with the audience

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what you do as a VP of Operations?

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Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: Sure. Yeah. So I'm currently the VP of

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Operations for the projects in California to facilitate most of

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the projects actually, all of our projects in California, our

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large transportation transit projects include the California

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High Speed Rail package from Madera to Fresno. The Purple

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Line, section two And section three projects, which are the

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underground subway extending the red line, to the new purple line

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for LA Metro, which includes four underground stations and

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two tunnels under water, some big mega projects, and then we

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also have a division 20 Torn back yard, which is the

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maintenance yard for LA Metro for their third rail system,

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where all the purple line and Red Line trains come to kind of

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get torn back and maintained on before they enter Revenue

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Service. So we're expanding that project schedule. So yeah, some

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really large projects. I mean, right now, there are over $500

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million of backlog in Fasken.

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Wow.

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Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: Yeah. Challenging?

Melinda Lee:

Wow. Well, congratulations on your success.

Melinda Lee:

I mean, some people want more projects, where you you're like,

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Okay, how do I handle all these big complicated projects? Some

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of the huge, there's so many, it's so complicated in your

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eyes, like, what are the challenges that you see?

Melinda Lee:

Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: So, I mean, the first challenge is

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finding the finding the right skill set to it's a very

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specialized industry, I think, the rail industry, you know, we

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had a, had a low period, you know, and, you know, what, 20

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years ago, or so, you know, it was probably had a low period,

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and there's not a lot of awareness in the industry on,

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you know, on this amazing industry that generates a lot of

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jobs and generates, you know, just just, there's a lot of a

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lot of action. And while you know, people don't, I guess find

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rail to be sexy in the, in the market of electric cars, and

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Google and all these techies, you know, I think the, I think

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there's a lot of technical skill is required to kind of make, you

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know, make these things work and make sure they're safe. And, you

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know, that at the end of the day, it can serve the public in

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the most safest manner possible. So, I mean, yeah, that's just

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the lack of skill set is, you know, is our biggest challenge.

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So a lot of times, we are constantly, you know, training,

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you know, entry level engineers, and, you know, to kind of learn

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about this, and the advantages, I mean, you know, these jobs are

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typically seven to 10 years, sometimes longer, there's a lot

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of stakeholders involved with the cities and different

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government agencies, utilities, so they take, they take a long

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time, and, and, you know, so it's good that we can, you know,

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get some entry level engineers and train them on some of the

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functions on how to do some of these things. But at the same

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time, you know, the biggest challenge we have is trying to

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keep them motivated, you know, because the end is not there,

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you know, not insight. And a lot of time, a lot of times, they

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haven't seen what the end looks like, they don't really know

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what they're working towards. I think so it's been very

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challenging to keep them motivated. And, you know, and I

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think, especially with the current generation, in terms of

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the current graduates we have, I think they're looking for that

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immediate feedback for everything and they, you know,

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if you ask any one of them, like, hey, you know, what do you

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want to do in five years and like, oh, I want to be a project

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manager, you know, I want to lead people and manage and, and

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you know, a lot of times as well few, you don't know what the end

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looks like, you know, how can you manage something that when

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you don't know what the end looks like, and so, yeah, I

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think I think it's been challenging to keep them engaged

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in keeping you know, routine routine people and keeping them

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motivated. Yeah, so that's been a huge challenge for us. So I

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mean, from I mean, as a leader I kind of might my approach is

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quite, you know, I'm not a very title. I'm not title heavy. Vice

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President does show up and you know, Flex is not I think my

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approach is more you know, I always say my role is a support

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role. My first job is to support the project in terms of what

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they need and and I think I make it very clear they get nothing

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is below me in terms of if I need to go do what an engineer

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does. On the first thing I do it you know, if I if they're

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falling behind, I stepped in So what that does, it does create

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some comfort for people to approach me. So I, you know,

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become, I think I'm pretty approachable to people, you

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know, people reach out to me, you know, engineers reach out to

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me directly asking for help if they need to, and a lot of

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communication, so I tend to be pretty open in my leadership

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style.

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You know, I know, there are things, you know, there are

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things you can share and things you cannot, but in terms of what

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I can share, I tried to share, you know, in terms of what the

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company's doing, where some of the challenges are, how we're

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looking at financials, you know, just try to be open about it.

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And I think it does generate some engagement from employees

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when you, you know, when you share with them, you know, and

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the other thing that, you know, we have a pretty low retention,

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I mean, a pretty high retention in terms of employees, you know,

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are people on your team?

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So, teams, I mean, they vary, you know, even from I think,

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right now, it's from a salaried staff. Probably 60 ish, people.

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And, right, yeah, I think mostly, you know, we have, you

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know, where you're a union contractor, so we have a lot of,

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you know, support from in terms of our craft labor from the

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local unions we work at. So, yeah, so our team's project

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champion, when you could have 100 to 200, electricians, plus

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the staff, and ensuring that everyone does what they need to

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do and stay safe and kind of work through that whole project

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cycle for, you know, the seven to 10 years, you know, can be

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challenging. So,

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yeah, well, how have you helped them to feel

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motivated? How can you tell they're not motivated?

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Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: You can tell? Because it doesn't get

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done, right?

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Yeah, so I mean, we try to keep, we try to do things. I mean,

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there's two types of management style one is obviously, you

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know, there's always these, especially entry level engineers

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that don't have the skill set and know what the what to get

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done. So we have this task based management. And then we have

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these ownership based management where, you know, when they have,

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when they have the experience, we give them the ownership and

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say you own it, and then, you know, deal with it. I think the

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biggest help we've had is we we do a lot of sit downs. And we

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talked to her to talk to employees, right now, I say,

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engineering, but most of our most of our staff are engineers,

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but we talk to them a lot, you know, we have sit downs with

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people to constantly give them feedback on how they're doing

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the people, you're talking to 60 different people. Yeah, we

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talked to a lot of people.

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Awesome.

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Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: Now, keep in mind, I mean, you know, you

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know, I think, again, the idea is that as managers, you

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shouldn't be managing one three or four people, right. So but I

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do try to stay engaged with the, you know, the project, and I

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have, you know, they have their own supervisors. And so I always

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bring them in, and, you know, it's not, you know, but I think

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talking to people, you, especially when you have these

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jobs, I mean, people have personal issues they're dealing

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with people have, you know, there's a lot of things can

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happen in seven to 10 years, right, people? Kids, yeah,

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there's a lot of them, right.

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So there's, there's so many variables. So trying to keep

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someone Yeah, I think I think the, the biggest thing that has

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helped is to communicate with them and how they can and not

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and not sugarcoat when they're not doing well, either. But But

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I always try to, I try to, say majority of the time, because

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sometimes you got to be, you know, you got to be a stickler

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and kind of, kind of make a point. But a lot of times I try

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not to put people in a defensive mode, because the minute you put

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somebody and you tell somebody, Hey, you're doing a crappy job,

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and, and they're defensive, then everything that comes out after

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that is I don't, there's no value in that drill. I tried to

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keep it engaged, I tried to say something instantly negative

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about the personnel say, Hey, here's what it is, but here's

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what I can do, you know, here's what we can do to kind of help

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you get back there or, you know, we'll add some resources to help

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you out. So so they feel like they're not alone on an island

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by themselves. So, so that's, that has helped us, you know,

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helped us you know, keep the motivation and honestly because

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I probably are probably more engaged than it shouldn't be the

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level of leadership but I think what that does is it allows me

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to kind of see people and how they perceive things and how

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they take things and you know, and see changes and because I'm

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in the maybe in the reads a little bit more than I should be

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it does you know, I think I have a better idea of how people are

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performing and as a result I can reward we can reward the people

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that are performing and you know, and have them go within

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the company so well I think that that shows that you care that

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you show it shows that you are there for them and you know

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exactly when a museum like that that type of leader because you

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earlier you said you know what type of leadership style and

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some people like when you're there for them more they feel

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more valued. And then you can start to know when it is that

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you give them the ownership like when it is that you let them go

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and just take it off and run with it. Right. So it's like,

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yeah, knowing that I only know I

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And I maybe I'm an emotional leader. In a way, emotional

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intelligence is critical. And I think emotionally being theirs

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is important because I think I think I've seen it because I

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work for people that are engaged in people that are like, high

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level, hey, come to me if you have a problem with this kind of

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stay, you know, away, and that that works in regard to it,

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because it empowers people to make decisions. And so I, I

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there's a fine line between being involved and empowering

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people to do what they need to do. So that so that sometimes,

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you know, I have to sometimes I've pulled myself back and say,

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Okay, well, I'm not going to do it for them, because then all

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you're doing is kind of doing it for them, then they don't feel

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the the satisfaction of completing something on their

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own. So that's a fine line, it really is a fine line is that,

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especially if like you said, there's so this project is so

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long, like, how about celebrating all those small

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little? Do you do that, like small little miles. So really

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celebrate that more? We I mean, we, I wish we do more? Honestly,

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I think as a as an industry, I think we're just so there's time

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is very limited, and there's so much to get done. I mean, you

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know, just the just to get through the design and the

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submittal process to get everything approved. I mean, it

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could take four years into the job. And so there's a lot of lot

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of things. I mean, we have 6000 7000 submittals that we have to

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do. And you know, there's just so much a week, I wish we do

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more. I mean, we know we do the lunches, and you know, we do

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things like that, and you know, but I think as a company, I wish

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we do more. If it's up to me, I probably would I think you know,

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I think as an industry, the culture of doing those kinds of

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things don't really exist.

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But if it's up to me, I would say that we should try to do

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more in a more engagement and more team building. And like,

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you know, we've done a few like we've done an escape room, and

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we are we've done some things to kind of, you know, sure, but no,

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not enough, honestly. And how about you like how do you as a

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leader stay motivated you to do motivate everybody else? And

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then what about you? It's tough. It's tough. I mean, one is, you

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know, going through the LA traffic and kind of go through

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all these places, you know, it can be quite challenging. And,

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you know, that's when you, you're glad that you're building

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a train line to kind of improve the situation as a whole. No, it

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is, it is I mean, you know, I have, I mean, I have a very

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good, you know, very good relationship with my boss and

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Reena, we talk about strategies and things all the time. And,

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you know, I think we kind of, I always say, We're the yin and

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yang, because we are, we are so different in our outlook on

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things, but it works really well because we are kind of

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opposites. So the challenges he has, you know, I think I have

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the strengths and understand those things I struggle with

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Pete You know, so. So I think that really helps be able to

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talk to someone, you know, not liking by appointment, but

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almost like an open door. We constantly talk and strategize

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things, and we try things and if it fails, we try something else.

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So I think that surely, you know, I think having a

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supportive, you know, the boss helps, you know, because that

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keeps you engaged and kind of motivated. I mean, don't get me

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wrong, I've had, I mean, trust me there, you know, every every

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two or three years be like, I just need to apply for another

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job. And I'm just so tired of this. But no, I think I think

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the I think the biggest thing is,

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you know, being again, I think it really helps that I am

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engaged with the people. Because I think if I was just connected

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with, with the people, I wouldn't have a personal stake

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in the success of everyone and, and people I've hired and people

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have, you know, made commitments to and things like that. And if,

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if I didn't have those things, I probably wouldn't be as

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motivated. Because I'm like, I you know, it's not a place. But

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I think all those things really helped. I think so just to

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summarize, I think, you know, having that communication style

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of being approachable, people can talk to you. But at the same

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time, they know, you know, you're the boss and you need

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something, you need something, you know, having that fine line

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being there in front of them to see, you know, so they

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understand you understand the struggles as well. I think all

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those things kind of create a good camaraderie in the group.

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And you know, it helps. It helps oh my gosh, it helps so much.

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Can you imagine them being in a community or an environment

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where there's no manager, they would be gone? They would, there

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is no manager to support them, they would literally be out the

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door. So I love like, you know, we spend a lot of times and this

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goes for everybody in the audience. When we're in an

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environment, we cannot do a mean the environment is what it is

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right? Sometimes we can make move a little bit, but it is

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what it is. So I love that you're finding your why, like

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you're finding the reason for being here. Like you said, if it

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weren't for the people or weren't for your manager, then

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you probably have no stake in it. So you might be doing

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something else. So because you found your why. And you're

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supporting these people, your your your team, your manager,

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all of you lifting each other up. I mean, you're obviously

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building skills and bonds and experiences that may not show on

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the sheet, the bid sheet project

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Mind, but they probably will. I mean, I think

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it does in some ways, right, the camaraderie that you can go

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through different obstacles.

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Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: Because you make money if you people are

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motivated.

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Yeah. So you have a solid team. Right. So I really

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believe that. And I think that that's all because like you

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said, you're like a sort of like a leader that has high empathy.

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And, and and also, it's rare to have to have both the

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engineering skill set and capacity and also the people

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capacity. So kudos to you. They're lucky to have you. Thank

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you. Yeah. Yeah. So So could you share? What is one leadership

Melinda Lee:

tip for the audience that you can share? To help build their

Melinda Lee:

voice to help build them as a leader?

Melinda Lee:

Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: Yeah, I think stay engaged. Yeah, you

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know, because I think I think, you know, I think that's a big

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problem I've see is that, you know, when people get promoted,

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they, they tend to look, I mean, again, as leaders, we need to be

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looking ahead and looking at the big picture and those things,

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but at the same time, I think we need to communicate those vision

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clearly. To your employees, I think it's, it's, you know, when

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we're falling behind, I mean, someone needs to someone needs

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to talk and we need to give the talk, but at the same time, you

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know, you need to do it in a, in a compassionate way, and

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understanding and I guess, have a pulse on the things you do.

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Because if you if you get disconnected, then then really,

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all you're getting is a story that someone else is telling you

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and painting a different picture. You know, and I always

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say that, you know, it's like pink playing telephone, right?

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By the time you get the final news, it's like, you know, the

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word is like something else. Right? So, I think it's

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important to stay engaged, and you know, and be approachable,

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but it's not really, you know, not to break the chain of

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command and, you know, kind of respect the chain of command,

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but at the same time, stay engaged enough that, that, you

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know, you know, what's going on. And I think that I think that,

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you know, changes the trajectory of, at least in my experience

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has helped me, you know, grow. I mean, I'm 39 years old, you

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know, right now, and, you know, I think, you know, quite doing

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quite well for, for these large projects, you know, he's not a

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30 year guy in the industry now. So, I think a lot of that comes

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from, you know, being engaged, you know, being engaged with

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people and, and not letting go, I think that really helps. And

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people are having also having, like, said, empathy, you know,

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people are going through stuff, you know, work is not the only

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thing they do people want to do other stuff, and, you know, have

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offerings and flexibility in that regard, you know, helps and

Melinda Lee:

goes a long way. And, you know, if someone works a Saturday,

Melinda Lee:

I'll be like, okay, you know, take a day off, you know, no

Melinda Lee:

problem, having those kind of things because, because reality

Melinda Lee:

is like, you know, like, one of the things I do is if someone

Melinda Lee:

has to work a Saturday or Sunday, because some things come

Melinda Lee:

up, I will say, you know, what, take another day somewhere, you

Melinda Lee:

know, we understand you're away from your family. I mean, having

Melinda Lee:

those little things, you know, they help, you know, they help

Melinda Lee:

keep your employees engaged. And hopefully, hopefully, they

Melinda Lee:

respect you at that time to you know, stay with you. So,

Melinda Lee:

yes, yes, yes. Well, obviously, you, you're

Melinda Lee:

successful, and you've done a great job, because your

Melinda Lee:

retention rate the people that guess that they're really there

Melinda Lee:

to support you. So congratulations on your work

Melinda Lee:

with that, by taking so much pride for sharing that

Melinda Lee:

knowledge. So stay, engage, stay engaged, stay curious with your

Melinda Lee:

people connected to your people, right? Go far, you don't want to

Melinda Lee:

you we don't want to climb this mountain alone, we want to be

Melinda Lee:

you want to.

Melinda Lee:

Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: I mean, that's the thing. You want to be

Melinda Lee:

on the top of the ladder, you need all the rungs and you need

Melinda Lee:

somebody on the ladder.

Melinda Lee:

Thank you so much. I've learned so much. And I

Melinda Lee:

trust also the listeners who are here. Hey, if you want to get

Melinda Lee:

into railway and engineering, I mean, it's a lucrative, like you

Melinda Lee:

said

Melinda Lee:

Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: it is right now. I mean, just to give

Melinda Lee:

you a heads up, I mean, you know, we are right now building

Melinda Lee:

for the Olympics and 28. Yeah, I mean, if you look at if you if

Melinda Lee:

you get curious, if you go to LA metros website and look at all

Melinda Lee:

the capital projects that are coming. I mean, there's projects

Melinda Lee:

all the way to 2045 2050 just just in LA, right. So I mean, I

Melinda Lee:

mean, that's just the construction side of it, then

Melinda Lee:

there's the maintenance side of keeping these things up, you

Melinda Lee:

know, LM Metro has a lot of openings. You know, on the

Melinda Lee:

contractor side, there's maintenance programs. And so

Melinda Lee:

it's a very lucrative industry. It's a very specialized

Melinda Lee:

industry. And the good thing is, we kind of know other players in

Melinda Lee:

the industry, because it's such a small community. And, and I

Melinda Lee:

think, I think from a conversation I mean, you know,

Melinda Lee:

we, you know, it's hard to keep up with the tech companies and

Melinda Lee:

all that stuff. But, you know, but also I always say that tech

Melinda Lee:

companies is an up and down industry. While construction is

Melinda Lee:

like you know, when the when the economy is booming, they spend

Melinda Lee:

on infrastructure when the economy is going down, they

Melinda Lee:

spend on infrastructure, right so there's Always that

Melinda Lee:

continuous, you know, secure security in the in the

Melinda Lee:

workplace. And, you know, I think there's a lot of sort of

Melinda Lee:

stability in what we do. And I think there's, honestly, I think

Melinda Lee:

we pay, I think, as an industry, the transportation industry tend

Melinda Lee:

to pay more than the standard construction industry, because

Melinda Lee:

we understand the challenges of, you know, working on these long

Melinda Lee:

jobs. And, and, you know, we, there's a lot more, you know,

Melinda Lee:

compensation available, available for that. So I really

Melinda Lee:

hope that if, you know, if you're interested, you can

Melinda Lee:

always reach out to me or, you know, I mean, I'm on LinkedIn,

Melinda Lee:

and if you have questions about the industry do reach out, and

Melinda Lee:

I'd love to talk to you, and help you kind of understand the

Melinda Lee:

industry and, you know, the potential options available to

Melinda Lee:

grow within the industry. So I mean, I'm hoping my son, I'm

Melinda Lee:

hoping to retire in this industry. It's, it's, it's

Melinda Lee:

challenging. And, you know, it's political in regards, and

Melinda Lee:

there's a lot of a lot of things happening. And I will surely say

Melinda Lee:

that, if you're considering the industry, I think, a strong

Melinda Lee:

communication and I mean, being type A, having the skill set of,

Melinda Lee:

you know, you need to be able to communicate, I think, I think if

Melinda Lee:

you're a I mean, it's perfectly fine. If you're, you know, you

Melinda Lee:

know, like, introverted person that, you know, I don't think

Melinda Lee:

it's that's the issue. I think it does, it does require a lot

Melinda Lee:

of communication, because you're working with so many elements in

Melinda Lee:

so many disciplines and contractors, and if you don't

Melinda Lee:

have a strong communication, you tend to not be successful in

Melinda Lee:

this industry, you know,

Melinda Lee:

right, right. Right. So So yeah, even if you

Melinda Lee:

are an engineer at heart and love the numbers and loves

Melinda Lee:

sitting behind the spreadsheets, it's still, we all need to have

Melinda Lee:

that communication, and especially if you're, like,

Melinda Lee:

you're a woman you're gonna stand out.

Melinda Lee:

Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: So it's funny, I do see it, I mean,

Melinda Lee:

that, you know, since that topic, you know, so I have two

Melinda Lee:

daughters, you know, I always know when I drive to these

Melinda Lee:

construction sites, and I always point out, like, Hey, that's my,

Melinda Lee:

and the first thing they always ask me what I don't see any

Melinda Lee:

woman construction worker. So, you know, I mean, it is good,

Melinda Lee:

like these LA Metro jobs. I mean, you know, surely woman in

Melinda Lee:

construction is it hasn't been, you know, thing, and now. Yeah,

Melinda Lee:

it's coming in, actually, we have several electricians that

Melinda Lee:

are, you know, that a woman, and actually, even on these big

Melinda Lee:

projects, there's actually a requirement to engage more women

Melinda Lee:

in the industry. So I'm hoping, you know, I'm hoping we can

Melinda Lee:

motivate more women and honestly, you know, in my

Melinda Lee:

experience, I mean, not to be, you know, taking a position, but

Melinda Lee:

when it comes to, I think women are required in the construction

Melinda Lee:

industry, because I feel like their, their, their skill sets,

Melinda Lee:

there's some skill set that women bring that I haven't, I

Melinda Lee:

think, you know, in terms of organizational in terms of

Melinda Lee:

tracking stuff, and, you know, there's things I've had that I

Melinda Lee:

think woman do a better job. And I mean, I'm hopefully no,

Melinda Lee:

shouldn't be saying that, but really, they do a better job of

Melinda Lee:

keeping things organized, that, you know, that I tend, I think,

Melinda Lee:

I think we, you know, we as men struggle, you know, sometimes

Melinda Lee:

and so I think it's a good, I wish and I hope, you know, more

Melinda Lee:

women can come into the industry, and it's changed. You

Melinda Lee:

know, it was a, you know, the change from before, I think was

Melinda Lee:

kind of tough for women to be in the industry. And I think, you

Melinda Lee:

know, people have changed and I think the outlook on woman in

Melinda Lee:

that regard has changed. And we both on the owner side, and on

Melinda Lee:

the contractor side, you know, I think there's more. I'm glad to

Melinda Lee:

see more women coming into industry. And I think my younger

Melinda Lee:

daughter has already told me she wants to be do what I do for a living.

Melinda Lee:

So that's so cute. So cute. I love that. Oh, good,

Melinda Lee:

good, good. I love that. And on that note, we're gonna we're

Melinda Lee:

gonna end it. I think that was a great positive message to share.

Melinda Lee:

And so reach out to Pratt, if you have any questions about the

Melinda Lee:

industry. He's looking for great workers, engineers, and so, so

Melinda Lee:

reach out. Thank you, Pratt so much for your time for your

Melinda Lee:

expertise. It's been great.

Melinda Lee:

Pratheesh (Prat) Nair: Thank you, Melinda for having me.

Unknown:

Thank you. Bye. Listen, until next time. Take care.

Unknown:

Bye bye